British Cinema: A History

GLOBAL STUDIES 320

British cinema has gotten a bad rap. French film director Fran├žois Truffaut once declared that cinema and Britain were incompatible terms since "the English countryside, the subdued way of life, the stolid routine-are anti-dramatic. . . [even] the weather itself is anti-cinematic." Yet British films proudly rank among some of the most acclaimed and beloved in film history: Monty Python and the Holy Grail, A Hard Day's Night, Lawrence of Arabia, The Third Man, Zulu, The Ladykillers, A Night to Remember, Trainspotting, The King's Speech, and the James Bond franchise. Admittedly, British cinema has had its ups and downs, never quite knowing whether to position itself as a distinctive national cinema or as a rival to Hollywood. This uncertainty has fostered a rich diversity and complexity that this course will emphasize in a survey approach. We will give equal attention to the work of high-profile directors like Alfred Hitchcock and Michael Powell and to important "genres" in which the British seem to excel--like black comedy, imperialist adventure, "kitchen sink" drama, documentary, and the so-called "heritage" films that paved the way for television's Downton Abbey. Required Screenings: Wednesdays @ 4pm
Course Attributes: EN H; BU IS; AS HUM

Section A

British Cinema: A History
INSTRUCTOR: Studlar
View Course Listing - FL2022

Section 01

British Cinema: A History
INSTRUCTOR: Studlar
View Course Listing - FL2022